The Flag That’s Never Furled

2014-08-25 BallyduffMemorial+
Translations of Psalm 60.4 vary, but it is something like “You (the Lord) have given those who fear you a banner so that they will not flee before your arrows”, which might work quite well alongside a Union jack. But in fact, only one source claims the poetic lines on the side of this Ballyduff electrical sub-station come from Psalm 60.4; they are rather the first stanza of a 1902 poem (earliest found mention)The Union Jack, by Edward Shirley, in Little Poems For Little People: 
‘Tis thy flag and my flag, the best of flags on earth;
Oh, cherish it my children, for ’tis yours by right of birth.
Your fathers fought, your fathers died, to rear it to the skies;
And we like them will never yield, but keep it flying high.
For the other three sides of the structure see Absent Friends | The Ultimate Sacrifice. For the mural in the distance (of the wide shot, below), see 1st East Antrim Ballyduff
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2014 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/1600, ISO 400, full size 3888 x 2592
2014-08-25 BallyduffMemorialWide+
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2014 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/640, ISO 400, full size 3888 x 2280
text: X02110 X02113 at the going down of the sun 1914 1918 uvf ycv rir ulster volunteer force young citizen royal irish rifles
so cherish it my children it’s yours by right of birth to raise it to the skies must never yield john stewart

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.