An Attitude Of Revolt

The Tommy Roberts mural at the top of Westland Street, Derry, has been expanded, with a new central image – which now includes a portrait of Stevie Mallon alongside Roberts, against a background of Free Derry Corner – and three additional plaques.

Both quotes (“Life springs from death, and from the graves of dead patriot men and women spring living nations.” and “As long as Ireland is unfree the only honourable attitude for Irishmen and Irishwomen is an attitude of revolt.” are from Patrick Pearse. The first quote was also used on a Gibraltar 3 mural in Belfast and an INLA mural in Strabane in 1990; the latter was used in a Belfast in the 1980s.

“In proud and loving memory of Tommy Roberts, former IRA volunteer, former POW blanketman, died 8th June 2017 aged 78. His courage and dedication will never be forgotten. As long as Ireland is unfree the only honourable attitude for Irishmen and Irishwomen is an attitude of revolt.”

“In proud and loving memory of Stevie Mellon, former IRA volunteer, former internee, former GAA referee, died 1st August 2018, aged 65 years. His courage and dedication will never be forgotten. Lay him away on the hillside with the brave and the bold.”

“In proud and loving memory of Veronica Taylor, a proud socialist republican. Born11th June 1943, died 16th December 2019, aged 76 years. Her tireless dedication to the republican struggle will never be forgotten. “The only people worthy of freedom are those who are prepared to go out and fight for it every day and die if necessary.””

“In proud and loving memory of Ruairí (Roddy) Carlin, former IRA volunteer, former POW, died 23rd March 2021. A brave son of Ireland who fought for his country against continued British oppression and injustice, an uncompromised republican committed to the reunification of Ireland.”

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Andy McDonagh/Eclipso Pictures (ig | Fb)
Camera Settings: f18, 1/400, ISO 400, full size 5184 x 3456

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Andy McDonagh/Eclipso Pictures (ig | Fb)
Camera Settings: f18, 1/400, ISO 400, full size 5184 x 3456

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Andy McDonagh/Eclipso Pictures (ig | Fb)
Camera Settings: f18, 1/400, ISO 400, full size 5184 x 3456
X10023 [X100024] X10025 X010022

Executed

On October 18th, 1922, the third Dáil/second Provisional Government Of Southern Ireland approved – in the absence of anti-Treaty members – a bill entitled the “Army Emergency Powers Resolution” which introduced martial law, including martial courts with the death penalty for anyone found in possession of an illegal firearm – “illegal” meaning not sanctioned by the nascent pro-Treaty Free State. Under these powers, seven IRA volunteers were executed on November 17th and 19th, followed on the 24th by Erskine Childers (a member of the team that negotiated the Treaty but subsequently against it). In response, the IRA declared that TDs who had voted for the bill were fair game, and on December 7th Seán Hales of Cork was shot and killed. In reprisal, the government ordered the execution of four more volunteers, one from each province: Liam Mellows, Joe McKelvey, Dick Barnett, Rory O’Connor. The four had been arrested five months earlier, on June 30th, 1922 at the start of the Civil War, after surrendering the Four Courts. By the end of the war, 81 executions had taken place. (An Phoblacht | Irish Times | The Irish Story | WP | WP)

For the left-hand side of the wall, on the shipyard clearings and the McMahon murders, see Belfast Butchery.

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/279, ISO 16, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/147, ISO 16, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/120, ISO 16, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1054)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/233, ISO 16, full size 2818 x 3301

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/2825, ISO 20, full size 4032 x 3024
[X09963] [X09964] [X09965]
X09952 X09959 [X09961] X09960 X10010 X10001

Belfast Butchery

“Belfast Pogroms 1920-1922.” Against the backdrop of the first Dáil, the War Of Independence, and the debate in Westminster over the fourth Home Rule bill (it would be passed in November 1920), northern Protestants began to assert their de facto independence from the rest of Ireland – both in economic and in military terms.

On July 12th, 1920, Edward Carson spoke to a crowd in Derry and, addressing the government in Westminster, said “if you are yourself unable to protect us from the machinations of Sinn Féin, and you won’t take our help; well, then, we tell you we will take the matter into our own hands.” (Treason Felony). Nine days later, the “clearings” of Catholics from Belfast shipyards and mills began, with about 5,700 Catholics and 1,850 socialists (“rotten Prods“) being expelled from Workman Clark and Harland & Wolff yards, and in total 10,000 workers from yards and mills over the next two weeks (History Ireland). In combination with the straitened economic circumstances of the time (post WWI) thousands (23,140 according to this mural, which reproduces a flyer derived from the Irish News of October 6th, 1920 – via The Irish Story’s account of the start of the “Belfast Pogrom”) were on relief.

Militarily, in October, 1920, the Ulster Special Constabulary was established (drawing on members of the Ulster Volunteers, which had been reconstituted in June 1920, and the 21,000 members of the Ulster Imperial Guards (WP)) as an alternative to the Royal Irish Constabulary in fighting actions by the IRA in Belfast, Derry, and elsewhere in the north. On March 23rd, 1922, two officers of the Specials were killed in Belfast city centre by the IRA. In reprisal, two Catholic civilians were killed in the Short Strand, and in the early hours of March 24th, a party of five men, four dressed in RIC uniforms, burst into the home of Catholic businessman Owen McMahon and shot McMahon, his six sons, and one of his employees – only two of the sons survived. District Inspector John Nixon of the RIC was suspected of leading the attack on the McMahon household – see The RIC Murder Gang and Pat And Dan Duffin. (The headlines are from the Freeman’s Journal of March 25th, 1922 – see Joe Baker’s 80-page account of the murders of summer 1922; the photograph of the McMahon corpses that is reproduced in the mural can be seen at Slugger.)

This is the first half a new mural in Ascaill Ard Na bhFeá; the “1922” part will be presented tomorrow.

“Belfast Expelled Workers – How Carsonism has disgraced Belfast – Help from all quarters of the globe for victims of sh[a]meful pogrom – Drain on Ex[p]elled Workers[‘] Relief Fund. Total number of expelled workers registered – 8,104; Applications for registrations yesterday – 500; Average number of persons receiving relief daily – 23,140.”

“Belfast Butchery – Horrif[y]ing story of massacre of McMahon family – Dying man[‘]s declaration – Murderers dressed in police uniform and spoke with Belfast accents.”

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/960, ISO 20, full size 2918 x 3890

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/2825, ISO 16, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 1000 x 750)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/1066, ISO 20, full size 3886 x 2914

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/9615, ISO 25, full size 3024 x 4032
X10002 [X10003] X10009 X10008 X09962

Have A Good Day

Two more by Nathan Bowen (ig | web store), in Donegall Street, Belfast – “Have a good day” and “Be inspired”.

See previously: Builders At Work | Covid-Era Canvasses

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/220, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/154, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032
X09721 X09722

For The Football

Before he died (in 2005), George Best asked that people “remember me for my football” and the phrase became the title of a Best retrospective. It is also inspired the life-size title of the statue of created by Tony Currie and funded by fans (Belfast Live) in front of Windsor Park (and the Glen Molly (ig) mural in Hill Street). When it was launched, the statue drew criticism for not looking like its subject (BBC | Newsletter). Soccer star sculptures are perhaps hard to do: here’s a list of ten questionable statues of soccer stars, including Maradona in Kolkata (Guardian) and Ronaldo in Madeira (BBC), but missing Mo Salah in Sharm al-Sheikh (BBC).

For an awkward painting of Best, see The Best A Man Can Get in Newtownards.

See also the new Best mural in Cregagh: Maradona Good, Pelé Better, George Best

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/121, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/171, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/122, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/50, ISO 32, full size 3024 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 918)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/1548, ISO 20, full size 3952 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/15, ISO 50, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/425, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032
X09767 [X09765] X09770 X09768 X09769 X09763 X09941 X09764 [X09766]

Lisnabreeny American Military Cemetery

The 148 US servicemen who were buried at Lisnabreeny, in the Castlereagh hills, died in Northern Ireland, and about 40 of them in air accidents, including the ten who died on June 1st, 1944, when a B-17 travelling from Newfoundland crashed into Cave Hill, killing all ten men on board (Wartime NI). The names of all 148 are listed on three sides of the memorial stone; their remains were repatriated or moved to the cemetery in Cambridge, England in 1948.

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/124, ISO 20, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f4, 1/120, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/120, ISO 20, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/30, ISO 32, full size 3024 x 4032

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/158, ISO 20, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/40, ISO 25, full size 4032 x 3024

Click to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f1.8, 1/171, ISO 20, full size 3024 x 4032
X08693 [X08692] X08690 X08689 [X08691] X08695 [X08694] X08688

Iconostases

This is a small memorial to the fallen British soldiers tucked away in Ogilvie Street, Belfast, that serves to remind the locals always to keep the sacrifice of the 36th Division always in mind. Below is the board next to it, originally seen in 2013.

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f4, 1/80, ISO 160, full size 4896 x 3264

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 759)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f5.4, 1/640, ISO 80, full size 4896 x 3096
X08883 [X08882]

Mighty Oaks From Little Acorns Grow

The city of (London)Derry takes its named from the Irish word “doire” meaning “oak wood” (and generically a “grove”) and the oak leaf is often used as a symbol of the city (here are 11 murals with oak leaves from the Peter Moloney Collection – Murals). In the mural above, in addition to the three leaves on the right-hand side, we also have some acorns.

The moniker “maiden city” is derived from the city’s resistance to sieges throughout its history, most famously in 1689 (again – a variety of images from Peter Moloney). The walls of the old city are shown above the river Foyle, with landmark buildings such as the Peace Bridge (see Waterside, Cityside, Quayside) behind them.

Mural by Inkie (ig) in Carlisle Road.

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Andy McDonagh/Eclipso Pictures (ig | Fb)
Camera Settings: f18, 1/400, ISO 400, full size 5184 x 3456
X10033 [X10034]

Christmas In Prison

A crude engraving about the size of your hand found on the wall of the B-wing yard in Crumlin Road Gaol (now a tourist attraction and conference centre): a Celtic cross with knot-work and “Jim Keenan – Xmas 1942”.

Below is a picture of the gaol from September 15th, 1942, thirteen days after Tom Williams was hanged (see the plaque to his memory in Bombay Street).

Click and click again to enlarge (to 900 x 1200)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f4, 1/100, ISO 100, full size 3024 x 4032
X10041

The Central Antrim Regiment

As this plaque in the Factory area of Larne indicates, the 2nd battalion of the Central Antrim regiment (of the Antrim division) of the Ulster Volunteers was drawn from Larne. Edward Carson reviewed the entire regiment at Drumalis in Larne on July 11th, 1914, (here is a postcard depicting the review) where he was presented with the colours of the 2nd from a Lady Smiley of First Larne Presbyterian. (The colours of the 1st and 2nd battalions are included below; the colours of the 3rd (Carrickfergus) Battalion can be seen at Sam’s Flags.) In the Royal Irish Rifles of WWI, Central Antrim became the 12th battalion (War Time Memories Project); its members included Larne man Rifleman Robert King.

“The Clydevalley flute band [Fb] proudly remembers all who served in the [Antrim Division,] Central Antrim Regt, 2nd Larne Battalion, Ulster Volunteer Force. Lest we forget.”

The plaque is on the gun-running mural and next to a King Billy mural in Greenland Drive. Both murals were seen previously in 2016; see Amazing Night At Larne and Civil & Religious Liberty.

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 900)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f2.4, 1/60, ISO 16, full size 4032 x 3024

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f5, 1/125, ISO 100, full size 5616 x 3744

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f5, 1/125, ISO 100, full size 5616 x 3744

Click and click again to enlarge (to 1200 x 800)
Copyright © 2022 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f4, 1/100, ISO 100, full size 5616 x 3744
X09339 [X09338] X09379 X09382 [X09380] X09381