Aftermath

2015-06-29 TigersWWICompleted+
June 15th saw the official ‘Arts For All’ launch of a mural featured all the way back in January. For the launch, artist Jonny McKerr added backgrounds to the cross-maker and bugler on the low wall in front, and the information-board in the centre was added. For background and the images on which the mural is based, see The Home Front (and also The Undertaker).
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/640, ISO 400, full size 3696 x 2416
2015-06-29 TigersWWICompletedBoard+
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/400, ISO 200, full size 2584 x 2592
2015-06-29 TigersWWICompletedWide+
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/400, ISO 400, full size 3456 x 2440
text: X02678 X02679 X02680 this mural shows images from the years 1912-1918 show what was happening at home and on the battlefield during the first world war and the years leading up to the war it is estimated over 16 million people died and 20 million were wounded one of the bloodiest in history two million horses reflects people’s lives changed part of a battle keeping communities going images decided after a lengthy consultation and research process study visits local aspects of life during those years women were employed range of jobs not previously had access to welder belfast shipyard workers went on strike for improved terms and conditions in 1917 throughout ireland left their families behind fight for king and country important medical care delivering coal to homes and factories keep industry alive battle of the somme 1st july 18th november 1916 on the banks in northern france over 1,000,000 were wounded or killed in human history irish soldiers 36th ulster division suffered more than 5,000 casualties on the first day employed to make crosses to mark the graves buried in unmarked graves bugler played the last post in british army camps to signal the end of the day when the duty officer returned to the field badhes of the 19 regiments from the island of ireland 80,000 cases of shell shock affected the poet sigfried sassoon the past is just the same and war’s a bloddy game have you forgotten yet? look down and swear by the slain of the war that you’ll never forget
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s