Carving Out A Place In History

2015-05-08 SPBCrest+
At first glance the piece above looks like a colourful mural but, as the close-up immediately below shows, it is in fact a large painted carving of lions rampant on either side of the emblem of the Shankill Protestant Boys flute band and theUlster Special Service Force – “first responders” from the Ulster Volunteers, ready to react to any threat at short notice (historyireland).
Click and click again to enlarge (to 3000 x 2000)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/250, ISO 100, full size 3888 x 2592
2015-05-08 SPBCarving+
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/125, ISO 800, full size 2592 x 3888
2015-05-08 SPBWWI+
Click and click again to enlarge (to 2000 x 3185)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/500, ISO 100, full size 2741 x 3935
2015-05-08 SPBInfo+
Click and click again to enlarge (to 2000 x 1734)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/200, ISO 100, full size 2890 x 2505
2015-05-08 SPBFull+
Click and click again to enlarge (to full size)
Copyright © 2015 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/80, ISO 800, full size 3712 x 1720
text: X02602 X02601 X02605 X02604 X02603 the great war 1914-1918 36th “The Ulster Division has lost more than half the men who attacked and in doing so has sacrificed it for the empire which has treated them none too well. The much derided Ulster Volunteer Force has won a name which equals any in history. Their devotion, which no doubt has helped the advance elsewhere, deserved the gratitude of the British Empire. It is due to the memory of these brave fellows that their beloved Province shall be fairly treated.” Captain Wilfred Spender HQ staff 2nd July 1916
The officers and members of the Shankill Protestant Boys flute band strive to achieve the same respect that our 1st battalion West Belfast Ulster Volunteers and Ulster Special Service Force “USSF” forefathers rightfully achieved in 1913, as they marched from Lawnbrook Ave to Fernhill House to enlist in Carson’s Army to defend Ulster from the 3rd Home Rule Bill, then again in May 1915 as they enlisted in Kitcheners Army as the 36th (Ulster) Division marching from Stewards Yard Aberdeen Street as the 9th Battalion Royal Irish Rifled through Belfast and off to fight in the Great War 1914-1918. wear the USSF badge and to this day we are proud to have USSF bloodline in our ranks, grandfathers grandsons and great-grandsons marching extensive repertoire consists of many wartime tunes such as Mountjoy clydevally the UVF gunrunning ship and many relating to the modern day volunteers SPB were formed in 1980 and many founder members are still marching today the reasons for forming the band were much more simply that establishing another flute band wanted to promote and express culture remember servicemen fought and died during the Somme offensive perished in during the conflict against violent republicanism flags 1982 carried with honour and dignity every parade humble homemade uniforms our wives made regimental uniforms over 125 members join more than learning music discipline educating our youth on our culture and history. no better feeling than marching with your own community clapping and cheering you on fellow bandsmen decorum SPB till we die carnan street c coy thiepval messines cambrai st. quentin arras ypres 1917 langemarck passhendaele passchendaele picary courtrai uvf ycv
Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s