The Burning Bush

“To commemorate the establishment of Presbyterianism in Ireland through the formation of the first presbytery which met in Carrickfergus on 10th June 1642.” Presbyterianism began in Scotland circa 1560 under John Knox and spread to Ireland with the colonising settlers of the 1600s. (For more on the first presbytery, see Ancestry Ireland.) Although Presbyterians supported the Williamite campaign they were subsequently discriminated against as “dissenters” from Anglicanism.

The sculpture is at Joymount Presbyterian in Carrickfergus

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Stones Of Hope

“If you’re looking for a sign … this is it.” ‘Stones of hope’ in support of mental health at the sea wall in Carrickfergus.

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Don’t Let Anything Stop You From Coming To Carrickfergus

This is the second half of the Carrickfergus Timeline in Market Place, covering the history of the town from arrival of King William and General Schomberg to the modern day, including the last witch trial in Ireland and the construction of a railway allowing tourists sailing into Larne to reach the town easily: “Don’t let anything stop you from coming to Carrickfergus – if you cannot get on a train, hire a donkey cart”. The panels were written by Seth Linder.

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The Leper Window

St Nicholas’s (Anglican) church in Carrickfergus dates back to the 1100s, prior to the castle. The low window shown above is known as the “leper window”. Patients from the leper hospital near the (northern) Spittal Gate to the city would come and listen in (Library Ireland). During the coronavirus pandemic of 2020, services are not even being held.

A virtual tour of the church is available in the church’s web site.

Recently in Carrickfergus: The Plague Grave. Covid-19 church-related posts from Belfast: Rediscovr The Powr Of Th Rosary | Prayer In The Time Of Coronavirus

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The Plague Grave

Care homes accounted for about 50% of the early coronavirus deaths in both Northern Ireland (WP) and the Republic (Irish Times). This Carrickfergus facility is named “Tamlaght” which comes from the Irish támh = plague and leacht = grave. Ireland suffered various plagues throughout history, including the Yellow Plague Of 644 and the Black Death in 1348 with “unheard of mortality” from recurring waves lasting until 1370. PlaceNamesNI states there 25 townlands bearing the name (and many other places too).

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Against The Terrorist Threat In Ulster

The original cairn commemorating three part-time members of the UDR (which can be seen in Carrickfergus RIR/UDR) – Henry Russell, Steven Carlton, and Walter Kerr – was replaced by a new obelisk in 2017. The medal in the middle is the Conspicuous Gallantry Cross, which was awarded to the entire RIR and UDR in 2006. (The UDR was merged with the RIR to form the Royal Irish Regiment in 1992.) (Video of the launch.)

Cyril Smith was a Catholic from Carrickfregus and a Royal Irish Ranger. The original cairn in his memory tells the story of his death at age 21 in 1990. For commentary, see this Irish Times piece.

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On Foreign Fields

 

“This plaque is dedicated to those men and women of the Orange Institution who volunteered to fight in the Great War for king and empire and who made the ultimate sacrifice on foreign fields.” A WWI commemorative plaque has been added to the Orange hall in Carrickfergus (seen previously in M05249).

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In The Pocket Of Sinn Féin

The Sinn Féin logo takes the place of the service’s emblem (which already contains a harp and a shamrock) on the cap of a PSNI officer. “Police Service Of Northern Ireland – destroying the loyalist community since 4th nov. 2001. In the pocket of Sinn Fein [sic]”. 

For the board below, see Graduated Response; for the hooded UVF gunman, see Progression Requires Inclusion.

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The Landing Of SARS-CoV-2 At Carrickfergus, March 2020

As he begins his trek around Ireland to vanquish the forces of James II, King William III wears a mask to protect himself from the novel coronavirus.

The title of today’s post is based on the old Bobby Jackson mural The Landing Of William III At Carrickfergus June 1690, itself based on a popular postcard.

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The Carrickfergus Knights

Carrickfergus dates back to the 1100s and contains a well-preserved Norman castle. The mediaeval history of the town is celebrated in a trio of knight statues in Marine Gardens.
Shown today is not the statue itself,, but a photographic reproduction on shutters in West Street.
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