We Are The Dead

The 10th (Irish) Division fought only briefly “in Flanders fields”, towards the very end of the war, having spent most of its time in Gallipoli (in the Ottoman Empire), Macedonia, Egypt, and Palestine. The 16th took part in the Somme, especially at “Guinchy” [Ginchy] and Guillemont, while the 36th were deployed on the first day (the Battle Of Albert).

The poem in the middle is the first half of John McCrae’s In Flanders Fields: “In Flanders fields the poppies blow/Between the crosses, row on row/That mark our place, and in the sky/The larks, still bravely singing, fly/Scarce heard amid the guns below.//We are the dead; short days ago/We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow/Loved and were loved, and now we lie/In Flanders fields.”

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Copyright © 2018 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f4.4, 1/125, ISO 80, full size 4632 x 3672
text: X06358 Ebrington Centre, Londonderry

Victoria Crosses Of The 36th (Ulster) Division

Dee Craig has updated the Victoria Crosses mural in Cregagh, honoring G[eoffrey St. George Shillington] CatherW[illiam Frederick] MacFadzeanR[obert] Quigg, and E[ric] N[orman] F[rankland] Bell. Five more were included in a board on the Shankill and another in Willowfield Street. (For the previous Cregagh version, see M03390)
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Camera Settings: f4, 1/80, ISO 80, full size 3300 x 3925
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text: X06313 [X06314] X06315 cappagh gardens

We Will Take The Matter Into Our Own Hands

2012-12-04 CarsonQuote+

“We in Ulster will tolerate no Sinn Féin but we tell you this – that if, having offered you our help, you are yourselves unable to protect us from the machinations of Sinn Féin, and you won’t take our help; we tell you, we will take the matter into our own hands …. ” A quote from Sir Edward Carson replaces the previous “free men” quote (see M03378); the poppies between the emblems in the main panel are also new, as is the plinth the hooded gunmen are standing on, which reads “1912 East Belfast Ulster Volunteer Force” (also, “1981 Gareth Keys 2008″). In other words, the mural has been softened (slightly) by adding historical elements.

Castlereagh Road, opposite Ravensdale Street.

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Copyright © 2012 Extramural Activity
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Camera Settings: f8, 1/25, ISO 100, full size 3888 x 2592
text: X02970 X00846 u.v.f. for god and ulster

July 1st

In the old style of calendar (prior to 1752), the Battle Of The Boyne took place on July 1st, the same date as the Battle Of The Somme (in the new style of calendar). It is reported that some soldiers from the 36th Division wore their Orange Order collarettes into battle. In the image above, they defend their trench from a German assault.
Carson signing the 1912 Covenant is the second of the pair.
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Copyright © 2012 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/1250, ISO 200, full size 3888 x 2592
Click to enlarge (to 2100 x 1400)
Copyright © 2012 Extramural Activity
Camera Settings: f8, 1/1250, ISO 200, full size 3888 x 2592
text: X00848 X00807

Tullygarley

This series of boards, painted by Caroline Jeffrey, presents life in Larne from the early 20th century. As part of the 2009 Re-Imaging Project, it is largely non-sectarian, and begins with the derivation of the name “Tullygarley” from the Irish for “Hillock of the Grey Calf”, but includes the emblem of the 36th (Ulster) Division and the gunrunning ship Clyde Valley. It replaces a “God save the queen”/1690 mural, visible here.

Info board:
“Tullygarley” means “Hillock of the Grey Calf” – thus the grey calf grazing with the cows.
The 36th Ulster Division – In September 1914 the Ulster Division was formed from the Ulster Volunteer Force which raised thirteen battalions for the three Irish regiments in Ulster.
Bleaching Green – Linen laid out in fields to bleach. The Bleaching Factory interior depicts the Bleaching process. (The building is currently derelict.) Blue Flax Flowers are the national floral emblem of Northern Ireland.
Local Primary School, Inver and Larne, known locally as “the Bridge”, as it looked in the 1930’s with the Inver River running through it. The bridge that the school was named after no longer exists.
Linen Factory of Glyn [Glynn] Road (no longer exists, site of abandoned garage) with inset depicting workers with weaving machines (circa 1924).
The old Tullygarley playground (mural site) with the Fountain in the foreground, and rows of houses on either side (Glynn Road and South Circular Road).
Sun Laundry Van. Sun Laundry showing people working inside (now Rea’s Furnishings, Bank Road).
Larne Lough – it is an area of special interest, a special protection area and a Ramsar site in order to protect the wetland environment.
SS Clyde Valley – launched in July 1886. Was used in 1914 to transport arms from Hamburg to Larne.
Roseate Tern – Larne Lough is the only breeding colony in Northern Ireland for the Roseate Tern, one of the UK’s rarest birds.

Copyright © 2009, 2015 Extramural Activity
X00334 X05035 X05036 X05037 [X00466] X05038 [X05039] X05040 X02556 Glynn Road, Larne