Virtute Et Opera

Clifton House was originally opened in 1774 as a poor house run by the Charitable Society. The extensions were badly needed by the growing city when they were opened in 1872 (BCS). The funding came from brothers Edward and George Benn. “This and the corresponding wing were erected by Edward Benn Esq. of Glenravel House and presented to the Belfast Charitable Society 1872.” Glenravel estate was in the Antrim glens; there used to be a Glenravel Street just west of Clifton House (where the motorway now is).
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Idols Of The Tribe

A holy trinity of Liverpool FC flag, the west Belfast “peace” line, and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Finn Square, Belfast.
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The People’s Priest

Edward Daly died in August 2016 and a memorial stone to his memory was quickly erected along Rossville Street, near the spot of Daly’s well-known intervention during Bloody Sunday, trying to lead victim jackie Duddy to safety. The stone was unveiled by two of the people portrayed in the Civil Rights mural in the background– John Hume and Ivan Cooper (Derry Now).
“The Peoples [sic] Priest. This garden of reflection has been dedicated in honor [sic] of the late Bishop Of Derry (Emeritus) Dr. Edward Daly in heartfelt gratitude and thanksgiving for the wonderful work for the people of Derry and beyond. Rest in peace. To love means, loving the unlovable. To forgive mean, forgiving the unforgivable. Faith means, believing the unbelievable. Hope means, hoping when everything seems hopeless. Is ceist deacair é sin. [That is a difficult question.]”
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The Ghosts Of The Martyrs

“In proud and loving memory of all local volunteers, prisoners of war, republican activists and the unsung heroes who died of natural causes having served the cause of Irish republicanism. Together in unity you formed a bond which gave true meaning to the undefeated risen people. Your deeds of bravery and resistance will never be forgotten by the people of greater St. James’s.” With the famous quote from Máire Drumm at an anti-internment rally in Dunville Park on 10th August, 1975 (RN). Coiste Cuimhneacháin Lár Na bhFál/Ard Na bhFeá [Memorial committee of mid-Falls/Beechmount].
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We Will Remember Them

Dozens of boards to local soldiers from the 36th (Ulster) Division (by the 2016 Committee) have been added to the Mount Vernon memorial garden to the soldiers of the Great War (the mural) and contemporary UVF volunteers (the garden). For the mural, memorial stones, and outside plaque, see At Home And On The Mainland.
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Who Went To War And Never Returned

It is usually the fourth verse from Laurence Binyon’s poem For The Fallen that is quoted on memorial stones to the fallen of the WWI but here we have the third verse: They went with songs to the battle, they were young/Straight of limb, true of eyes, steady and aglow/They were staunch to the end against odds uncounted/They fell with their faces to the foe. The stone commemorates “the men of the 36th (Ulster) Division who gave their lives for King and country at the Battle of the Somme 1st July – 18th November 1916”. It is in the garden adjacent to the West Kirk Presbyterian church (Fb) on the Shankill Road. As the image below shows, the garden is also host to many small boards to individual soldier (see previously Among The FallenXXXVI | The Sacrifice Remains The Same).
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May You Live As Nobly As They Died

Strandtown and District Unionist Club used to be at 4 Belmont Road (Strandtown Hall) and it erected this memorial to local casualties in the Great War in Portland stone on the adjacent wall,(Lord Belmont in NI) which is now part of a Christian Fellowship church. “Hereon are recorded the names of those men and women who in serving voluntarily their King and country, laid down their lives. Pass not this stone sorrow but in pride and may you live as nobly as they died.” The building currently houses Bennett’s On Belmont, a UUP headquarters, and the Victoria Ulster Unionist Association upstairs.
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The Gravel Walks

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Poet Seamus Heaney died on this day 2013 and the gravestone erected in St Mary’s, Ballaghy, on the same day the following year. The epitaph is “Walk on air against your better judgement” from the poem ‘The Gravel Walks” in The Spirit Level.
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Continuing Conflicts

Two more panels and a wide shot of the memorial garden in Frenchpark Street. Above is a verse from John McCrea’s In Flanders Fields. Below is a plaque “to the memory of all those Ulster men and women from the south Belfast area who died during the great wars 1914-18 and 1939-45, and to all those who have lost their lives during the recent troubles and continuing conflicts.”
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Freedom Hath Arisen

“Oft from prison bars, oft from battle flashes/Oft from heroes’ lip, oftenest from their ashes.” The phoenix is used as a symbol of resistance in one of the oldest memorial plaques in Belfast (1993) with the names of deceased IRA volunteers and locals.
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